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What are your steps in post processing?

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4 years 4 months ago #4053 by Erin
The photoshop section of the boards isn't too active! Let's get the photoshop chit chat going!
Question - what are your go to post processing fixes? I try and try and try to take a picture PERFECTLY SOOC - but it rarely if ever happens. So I rely on photoshop - it's taken me forever but I finally figured out that SHARPENING really helps. Then I go Enhance, Check lighting, and check levels. I almost always have to drag the slider over a little from the left. Sometimes I adjust brightness and rarely I will adjust color curves.
So those are my go to:
Sharpen
Levels
Brightness
Color Curves
Oh and also - I will try to make the eyes pop.

What are your "go to" edits? And all these "actions" I've heard about - how do they work? Are they time savers? I can't get actions in photoshop elments 10 but I'm anxious to try Lightroom.

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4 years 4 months ago #4056 by Aldo Herrera
It depends pretty much on what the picture needs or where i want to go with it. I do use curves alot, and i do recommend getting lightroom and getting familiarize with it.
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4 years 4 months ago #4066 by jerry
Developing a workflow is important for sure. To go a little deeper I will talk about a family shoot I did and the workflow I use.
1st: I will look at all the photos and determine which to keep and delete.
2nd: Once I figure out which I keep, I will batch rename them in Bridge or Aperture 3, its a little more cusomized to show clients rather than having the basic camera number.
3rd: I will now do my basic editing in camera RAW because I shoot RAW.
4. Then I will make a contact sheet to send to that client, they pick the ones they like then I will do other types of edits like black and white, Selective Color, edgy borders possibly.
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4 years 4 months ago #4068 by Luke
I used to do my post in Photoshop, contrast, sharpening, levels, crop ect. Now I have switched over to Lightroom and even though I am doing the same edits I can do them more quickly and easily in Lightroom. The edits that I commonly use are nicely laid out in the develop module on the right. So I just start at the top and work my way down,

White balance
Tint
Exposure
Contrast
Highlights
Shadows
Whites
Blacks
Clarity
Vibrance
Saturation

There is also curves and colour management there but I don’t tend to use them much. This generally covers 85% of my editing and I only export to photoshop for heaver editing like adding or removing an element in a photograph.
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4 years 4 months ago #4070 by Erin
I love this thread and that I actually have some responses! Sounds like lightroom is really the way to go - but I don't have it yet so I have to work with what I've got. Photoshop.
As far as clients - I also delete several and narrow it down the best I can and break it up into folders. Or things like "family pose 1" or "sisters pose 1" - etc. I take far too many pictures to share each one with a family.
I am very interested in how anyone does post processing. I love the sharpening tool - and most of my photos could use a little sharpening. I can't believe the difference it makes.

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4 years 4 months ago - 4 years 4 months ago #4071 by Luke
Well from start to finish this is how I manage my workflow

I create a master folder on the computer which contains a number of sub folders
Raw (only contains RAW files)
Negs (contains jpegs exported from lightroom)
Edits (contains PSD of files I am currently editing)
Finals (contains any files from the neg folder that I have edited)

(1) I copy all of the raw files from the memory card to the RAW folder
(2) I open light room and import all the raw files
(3) Use quick collections in Lightroom to separate the files I want to keep and edit from the ones I don’t want
(4) Apply whatever editing that needs to be done in Lightroom as I said in my previous post
(5) I mark any files that may need some extra editing in Photoshop with a yellow tag (that’s a lightroom thing)
(6) I then export the edited files as Jpegs to the Negs folder
(7) I open any of the files that I have marked as yellow in photoshop and apply any additional editing
(8) Any files I am actively editing or may need to come back to are kept in the Edits folder as PSD, when I am finished I save them to the finals folder as Jpegs. There is a unedited copy kept in the Negs folder.

I keep a separate folder on the computer called FOR, it has more sub folders

6x4
5x7
10x8
12x8
Web

I place copys (never the originals) of the photographs in the respective folders depending on what size I want to get the prints made. As soon as I have got the prints made or the photograph uploaded to the web I then delete the photos from the FOR folder as I have the originals elsewhere.
Last Edit: 4 years 4 months ago by Luke.

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4 years 4 months ago #4072 by Luke
Also if you have never used Lightroom you can get a free 30 day trail from the adobe website.

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4 years 4 months ago - 4 years 4 months ago #4077 by jerry
thats sounds like alot of extra work with all those folders. I just basically use 2 folders. 1 for originals, then I'll create a contact sheet of (proofs for the client to look at) and after they tell me which ones they want, I also at this time have them give me the sizes they want for each one then I'll create a 2nd folder with the final sizes and edits And thats it. As far as color correction workflow goes, i just start with white balance and work accordingly to what my histogram gives me and I try to do it all in Adobe Camera RAW if I use that or Aperture 3.
Last Edit: 4 years 4 months ago by jerry.

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4 years 4 months ago - 4 years 4 months ago #4080 by Conor Casey
Gosh Erin, it all depends on the photo I am editing. Like, if I am doing a landscape, I often find myself blending and opening up shadows and increasing clarity and such. On the other hand, if I lose my mind and shoot people (:P), I usually do the opposite: no blending, and end up using the adjustment brush in Camera Raw to bring the clarity down to soften the skin.

I use Photoshop most of the time for most of my photographs. I find that for selective adjustments, it is still better than LR. I'm a big fan of camera Raw though (which is much the same as Lightoom) and always open in Camera Raw to get detail out of the file before moving onto the real PS if needed.

My go-to settings/sliders/the ones I use on the majority of photos in Camera Raw are:

1. Shadows/Highlights
2. White Balance
3. Clarity
4. Tone Curve
5. Graduated Filter
6. Adjustment Brushes

By the time I get into PS, the photo can be pretty much done, although I find that the image can sometimes need more intensive work like this shot, which I spend a long time on in PS.

If you'd like to try Lightroom for free, you're in look because the beta version is out now and can be downloaded for free! :cheer:

Also, thanks for getting some action/movement in the Photoshop section. :)

Conor Casey
Flickr
Last Edit: 4 years 4 months ago by Conor Casey.
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4 years 4 months ago #4111 by Erin
Thanks for the tip on a 30 day trial of Lightroom. I told my husband that I'd like to get it for my birthday. We're at that point where we a hard time coming up with ideas on what to get each other. ;)
But once in Lightroom, I think I'd be clueless - it's taken me this long to figure out photoshop!

Like on the Shadows/Highlights - with photoshop - I never thought about that - I do Ehhance, Ajust Lighting, then Levels - and DUH - now I see where it says "shadows/highlights" - So now I need to play with that.
And also white balance - I don't know where to find that on Photoshop Elements 10? Actually - Conor - I don't know most of what you you were describing - the clarity - is that the same as sharpening? The tone curve? Graduated Filter? What does Graduated Filter do? And adjustment brushes? I am clueless on most of that stuff!
Thanks for your time and help everyone!!!

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4 years 4 months ago - 4 years 4 months ago #4122 by Conor Casey
Lightroom is much easier to use than Photoshop and as a consequence, I think you will learn it much quicker than PS too. It is essentially like Camera Raw (well, the Develop module anyway) but has other bells and whistles like creating slideshows and books. LR is an excellent tool but for me, it doesn't replace Photoshop. It is a tool for organising photos and processing them in the develop module. For very heavy editing, Photoshop is still the best. That said, I'd guess 80% of my processing could be done in Lightroom now and with new versions being released (check out the beta 5 link in my last post), LR can only get better from here.

White Balance affects the colour temperature in Kelvin and will be in the Camera Raw section of Elements. When you open up a Raw file, Camera Raw is what will first greet you. If you are shooting JPG, you will have to right click on the image and hit "open in Camera Raw". I assume you shoot in Raw Erin? If not, I highly a advise you try it. :)

Clarity is in Camera Raw and is contrast in the mid-tones of a photo. In fact, everything I listed is from Camera Raw actually. Clarity will result in adding much less noise to the photo than would occur when sharpening. It doesn't really replace sharpening though.

The Graduated filter is probably my most used tool, along with the adjustment brush, and is found in Camera Raw too. It performs the same role as a physical graduated filter and darkens or lightens a portion of the image - usually the sky in my case, but I also use it to brighten up the foreground too. The Graduated filter is a local adjustment and is dragged over the image either horizontally or vertically. The beauty about the one in Camera Raw is that you can add in contrast, clarity, saturation, change the white balance, open shadows, bring down highlights to just one part of the image as well as darken or lighten by adjusting the exposure. :cheer:

The adjustment brush is also in Camera Raw and is similar to the Grad Filter, except it is like a paintbrush - yes, I sometimes feel like Bob Ross when using it on a landscape! :P It is better when you want to make a local adjustment to a small part of the image. With the paintbrush, you can do everything you can with the ND Grad, but in brush form. You can also change the hardness/softness of the brush so your adjustments feather and blend more/less. The brush also has one final use and that is to dodge and burn photos which I find myself doing a lot lately too.

The tone curve is like adding a curves adjustment in PS. You can change the shadows, highlights, lights and darks in curve form. I find that by the time I am done with the basic panel on Camera Raw, I actually don't use the Tone Curve too often although I do occasionally play with it as it can be quite powerful. I find I use it most when creating a Black and White in Camera Raw.

Hope that has cleared some of the terms up; sorry for the long post but I wanted to answer it properly. :)

Conor Casey
Flickr
Last Edit: 4 years 4 months ago by Conor Casey.

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4 years 4 months ago - 4 years 4 months ago #4130 by Bill
Since I have PS elements available to me at work I decided to look around a little bit. Looks like it has the same Camera Raw as Photoshop! who knew?? Anyways, if your shooting raw( and you should be(if not switch now :))) I really like using Camera Raw it's very similar workflow(as far as editing goes).

here's a great tut on using Camera Raw



I love Lynda.com they have great information and plenty of free videos to help you learn.

here's the link to PS elements 9 tut's! enjoy!

www.lynda.com/Photoshop-Elements-tutoria...%0aproducttypeid%3a2

There's a hand full of free videos to watch and they also have a 7 day free trail to watch as much as you can :woohoo:
Last Edit: 4 years 4 months ago by Bill.

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