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TOPIC: shooting moving water

shooting moving water 3 years 11 months ago #2532

I have recently purchased a Canon T4i. On a trip to Upper Michigan last month I took some pictures of water falls. I could get the water to stop in my pictures. The question is how do I take a photo of the falls and have the water moving and the background stay still. I know I will need to use a tripod and slow down the shot. As you can tell I am a new to making adjustments on the camera. Can anyone help with this?
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shooting moving water 3 years 11 months ago #2534

  • roy panaguiton
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yes it is better if you have the tripod and use a neutral density(ND) filter that will slow down your shutter speed. or you can up your aperture to make your shutter speed go slower. but effective way to do it is by using a ND filter.
hope this helps
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shooting moving water 3 years 11 months ago #2538

  • Conor Casey
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You definitely need a tripod because good luck holding the camera still for anything under 1/15! :P As Roy said, you need also need an ND filter. You have two options:

1) Buy a circular ND filter to fit to the front of the lens.
2) Buy a square ND filter to fit to a filter holder and then on to the lens

Option 2 might be better if you have got a few lenses because you can use the same filter on all of them by just replacing the adapter ring to attach the filter holder. This is cheaper than replacing the circular filter of number one for different lenses and it would also allow you to use other filters too like ND grads if you want. Check out Lee, B&W or Formatt Hi-tech. They come in varying degrees of strength from a reduction of one stop of light to ten stops. Any questions, feel free to ask us. :)
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shooting moving water 3 years 11 months ago #2566

  • Conor Casey
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One more thing actually that I have just noticed, should this topic really be in the welcome mat?
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shooting moving water 3 years 11 months ago #2567

  • Roy van Ommen
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Conor Casey wrote:
One more thing actually that I have just noticed, should this topic really be in the welcome mat?

Yes ;) So i moved it to another section. :)

About the question,

I think Conor and Roy said it all. You can always start with a slow shutter speed and compensate it with your aperture.

In the beginning, you don't need a tripod for that, a tripod will make the job easier though, but a steady ground can do the trick. Find a rock or so which you can trust your camera on, place your camera in manual mode and on timer, so you get less movement in your camera (so no movement of pushing the button).

A slower shutted speed of 1/25 or lower should do something already, you do not need a shutter speed of 10 seconds or so, for the beginning, try 1/25 or 1/10 for example.. and again, try to compensate with you aperture :)

Hope these tips will help you towards a result. I am looking forward to see it! :)

Greetings,
Roy
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