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TOPIC: Indoor Sports Photography

Indoor Sports Photography 2 years 11 months ago #5336

  • Dean
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Do you have any tips on shooting indoor sports such as basketball? I have a Nikon D90 with Tamron 18-270mm 1:3.5-6.3 and Nikkor 50mm f/1.8D. Obviously I get my best photos from my 50mm but want to be able to use the 18-270mm every once in a while but I ALWAYS get blurry photos. Is it better to use Auto Focus (AF) or Manual Focus (MF)?

The attached photo (if I attached it correctly) has an ISO 1600, 130mm, 0 EV, f/6, 1/80. All the subjects of the photo seem to be out of focus and I'm not sure what setting I need to change.



Please help!!

Thanks,
Dean
Last Edit: 2 years 11 months ago by Dean.
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Indoor Sports Photography 2 years 11 months ago #5338

  • Brent Ross
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I's use the tamron.
keep your shutter speed greater than 100
open up all the way
adjust iso to get exposure correct. Evaluate your histogram

Yes it will be noisy, but getting proper exposure reduces banding caused by underexposure. Noise can be dealt with in camera raw or lightroom, underexposure loses precious data.

The pictures will not be perfect, but given the setup shooting this way will be optimal.

Always use AF. It is very hard to MF through an optical view finder. MF is handy in a very few instances: macro, video, hyperfocal distance.
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Indoor Sports Photography 2 years 11 months ago #5339

  • Gabe
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- Try to keep your shutter speed higher then your focal length. For example, if youre at 50mm, your shutter should be at 1/50 or faster. This helps reduce camera shake. For sports, I would try to stay close to 1/250 or 1/500 of a second.

- Open your aperture as wide as it will go. I would assume at 130mmm, your widest F stop should be around 5.6.

- Increase your ISO if possible. This will help get those faster shutter speeds. It may produce noise but that can be reduced in post process.

- Auto focus! Your subjects will be moving faster then you can manually focus.
- Use spot focus so you can select your focal point instead of letting the camera choose.

- Try changing your meter mode. I primarily use spot metering but I think matrix metering will give you proper exposure in this situation.
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Indoor Sports Photography 2 years 11 months ago #5342

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ah and use a tripod. then you can lower your shutter speed a bit if you are ok with natural player movement motion blur.
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Indoor Sports Photography 2 years 11 months ago #5420

  • Roy van Ommen
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Well, my opninion is, don't use a tripod at first. Just bump your ISO to 800 or even 1600 and try to get a proper exposure.

To shoot sports, i always use a shutter speed above 1/250 /s on my 70-200 F2.8 @ F3.5 or @ F4.0.

Try to get that allright. You can even bump your shutterspeed up to 500 to just get decent shots, after using that and nailing that, you can try with lower shutter speed and try to move with the subject to get speed in your image...

So :) Just try that out. You can also try to shoot moving cars to just capture speed and try things out.. That worked for me...

Greetings,
Roy
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Indoor Sports Photography 2 years 11 months ago #5429

  • jerry
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well, it helps to have a camera that can handle the higher ISO's, which is probably what you'll have to use. A wide open apeture and a fast enough shutter speed to freeze the action. Shutter speed should be 1/500th or faster unless you want to try motion blur meaning keeping the subject sharp and bluring the background.
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